Saturday, 25 August 2007

THE FOG OF REID

Ken Berwitz

If you want to know how far Bush Derangement Syndrome sends some people into the netherworld of looney-tune ravings, you need only read this piece by Brian Maloney of www.radioequalizerblogspot.com.  Brian provides a transcript - and his analysis - of a bizarro-world interview of senate malaise leader harry reid conducted by Bill Press, who is to partisanship what ice is to the Arctic Circle.

Read this, listen to the audio link at the bottom, and put a cushion under your jaw, because it's going to drop:.

MIS-REID-ING AMERICA

Harry Blames Bush For His Own Terrible Poll Ratings

*** Exclusive To The Radio Equalizer ***

With less than two years to go in President Bush's second and final term, Democrats have grown so accustomed to blaming him for anything and everything that it must by now be instinctive and automatic.

But even within their own so- called "progressive" ranks, isn't there a limit to just how much can be pinned on the leader they so deeply despise?

During an interview with libtalker Bill Press yesterday, Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid (D-NV) took Bush- bashing into a new realm, actually blaming the president for his own rock- bottom approval ratings!

Take a look for yourself:

(Ed Schultz Show, Bill Press filling in, 23 August 2007, 14:00, segment one)

PRESS: Senator, I'm sure you were disheartened to see yesterday the Gallup organization came out with a new poll that showed that currently today the Congress holds an approval rating among the American people of an all-time low of 18%. Uh, how do you deal with that?

REID: Of course I'm disappointed in that, but if you go back to before they started doing polling, Will Rogers made a living criticizing Congress. Congress has always been criticized and as well it should be; the American people express their frustration through how Congress is doing. But if you go back historically, you'll always find that when you have a president that is so terribly unpopular, it also affects Congress. Ah we have been able to break through this, we've been able to pass minimum wage for the first time in ten years, pass ethics and lobbying reform which is so long overdue, we passed the balanced budget, we have been able to get disaster relief for farmers and ranchers, we've been able to fund children's health till the first of October, we've accomplished a lot. But we have to accomplish a lot more, of course I'm disappointed, I wish our poll numbers were a lot higher, but I understand the realities of the situation.

PRESS: And the reality also, Senator, is that the Republicans have put up a sixty-vote obstacle on most issues, and they have enough votes that they can stop you from getting to sixty.

REID: Bill, they have set the record for filibusters, by more than, if you go back and look at any time in history, you will never find more filibusters than the Republicans have initiated, which has made it very difficult for us to get things done. And I think the reason we were able to get a few things done right before we had our summer recess is because the Republicans have come to the realization that their game isn't working, the American people, you can tell with all the polls going on around the country with senatorial candidates, the Republicans are taking a terrible beating and unless they change dramatically in the next few months, come a year from this November there's gonna be no longer a 51-49 majority in the Senate, there will be a significantly higher (Democrat majority)

(Reid goes on to suggest that Dems may pick up nine Senate seats next year, due to GOP obstructionism)

Senator, how can Bush be to blame for how Americans see Democrats? That's downright kooky! In fact, that may take first prize for the craziest political statement of 2007.

In addition, even if the president is somehow dragging down your party as well, what explains the fact that his approval rating stands at 33%, while yours is a mere 18%?

Also note how instead of challenging Reid on what he must have known was an absurd statement, Press actually tried to cover for him by blaming the GOP's supposed obstructionism for harming congressional Democrats.

Last November, Democrats regained control of Congress based partly on dissatisfaction with Bush and his performance. Now that the public sees Dems as a bigger problem than Bush, attempting to blame the president is a great way to see those historic poll numbers fall even further.

UPDATE:
Ian provides the audio clip. .

You gotta luv this stuff.

There is a Democratic congress.  Why?  Because President Bush is so unpopular that voters rejected him by electing it.  So why has the Democratic congress' poll numbers dropped to historic lows?  Because President Bush is so unpopular, that's why.

Did I not tell you this would be jaw-dropping?

Here is the most powerful senator in the Democratic party, Harry Reid, telling you that the same dissastisfaction with the leader of the opposition party that put his party in power, is causing his party's approval ratings to plummet.  

To buy this insane drivel, you would have to be so dumb, so gullible, so imbecilic and so partisan that you are beyond hope. 

In other words, you would have to be a LAMB (a member of the Lunatic-left And Mega-moonbat Brigade). 

There, that sums it up nicely.


DEMOCRATIC IMPLOSION?

Ken Berwitz

In truth, I don't think the Democratic party is going to implode over this.  But a) however unlikely it is possible and b) far more probably this is going to cause a few firestorms that won't soon be forgotten.

Read this Associated Press article and see:.

Democrats Battle Over Florida Primary
Aug 25, 12:26 PM (ET)

By NEDRA PICKLER

WASHINGTON (AP) - Florida Democrats could lose their votes for the presidential nominee next year unless they change plans to hold their primary earlier than national party rules allow.

The Democratic National Committee's Rules and Bylaws Committee was poised Saturday to vote against Florida's plans for a Jan. 29 primary and to strip the state of delegate votes at the national convention in Denver next year, several party officials said.

With other states rushing to set early nominating contests, Florida offers the first test of the DNC's resolve to restore order to the schedule it set last year. Michigan and New Hampshire also are considering moving up their voting, in violation of the party rules.

Several party officials said they want to take a tough stand against Florida and send a message to other states. The shifting dates have added some uncertainty to the presidential candidates' campaign plans with the first votes to be cast in less than five months.

(AP) Karen L. Thurman, chair of the Florida Democratic Party, wipes a tear while testifying before the...
Full Image
Advisers to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has a wide lead in Florida polls, said she will go wherever elections are held. But the DNC has threatened to penalize candidates who campaign in states that violate the rules.

Other candidates are waiting to see how the dispute shakes out. Sen. Barack Obama's schedule had him raising money in Florida on Saturday, but his campaign said the Illinois senator might not return often during the primary season.

Party rules say states cannot hold their 2008 primary contests before Feb. 5, except for Iowa on Jan. 14, Nevada on Jan. 19, New Hampshire on Jan. 22 and South Carolina on Jan. 29. Florida ignored that calendar and passed a law setting its date for Jan. 29.

According to the rules, a violation means penalties: The Democratic congressional delegation and DNC members from Florida would lose their votes for the nominee at the Denver convention.

Also, the party's Rules and Bylaws Committee would decide whether to strip Florida of anywhere from half to all of its 185 other delegates to the convention.

The state party would have 30 days to change its plan before the sanctions would go into effect. Florida's Democratic lawmakers are pledging to fight back.

"We are quite concerned that Florida Democrats are going to lose their right to vote," Sen. Bill Nelson told reporters Friday. Recalling the 2000 presidential election controversy in Florida, he added, "And of all states, we have the sensitivity of this because of what we have gone through."

In 2000, the election between Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Al Gore was held up for a recount in Florida. The Supreme Court stopped the recount, and Bush won the state by 537 votes.

Michigan's Legislature has taken up a bill that would move its contest to Jan. 15, but the state party submitted a proposal that for now describes a caucus on Feb. 9. New Hampshire's secretary of state says he may move up the state's primary, but for now the party has submitted a plan for Jan. 22, with the notation that the date is subject to change. .

As should be pretty apparent, there is the potential for some very hard feelings here.  Especially among Floridian Democrats, who seem to feel that the 2000 election entitles them to chronic aggrieved party status. 

It seems hard to imagine that the national Democratic party would disenfranchise Florida in the 2008 convention, but you're reading the same article I am -- and the Associated Press isn't exactly an arm of the Republic National Committee.

Let's all keep an eye out and see how this progresses.


DEMOCRATIC IMPLOSION?

Ken Berwitz

In truth, I don't think the Democratic party is going to implode over this.  But a) however unlikely it is possible and b) far more probably this is going to cause a few firestorms that won't soon be forgotten.

Read this Associated Press article and see:.

Democrats Battle Over Florida Primary
Aug 25, 12:26 PM (ET)

By NEDRA PICKLER

WASHINGTON (AP) - Florida Democrats could lose their votes for the presidential nominee next year unless they change plans to hold their primary earlier than national party rules allow.

The Democratic National Committee's Rules and Bylaws Committee was poised Saturday to vote against Florida's plans for a Jan. 29 primary and to strip the state of delegate votes at the national convention in Denver next year, several party officials said.

With other states rushing to set early nominating contests, Florida offers the first test of the DNC's resolve to restore order to the schedule it set last year. Michigan and New Hampshire also are considering moving up their voting, in violation of the party rules.

Several party officials said they want to take a tough stand against Florida and send a message to other states. The shifting dates have added some uncertainty to the presidential candidates' campaign plans with the first votes to be cast in less than five months.

(AP) Karen L. Thurman, chair of the Florida Democratic Party, wipes a tear while testifying before the...
Full Image
Advisers to Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, who has a wide lead in Florida polls, said she will go wherever elections are held. But the DNC has threatened to penalize candidates who campaign in states that violate the rules.

Other candidates are waiting to see how the dispute shakes out. Sen. Barack Obama's schedule had him raising money in Florida on Saturday, but his campaign said the Illinois senator might not return often during the primary season.

Party rules say states cannot hold their 2008 primary contests before Feb. 5, except for Iowa on Jan. 14, Nevada on Jan. 19, New Hampshire on Jan. 22 and South Carolina on Jan. 29. Florida ignored that calendar and passed a law setting its date for Jan. 29.

According to the rules, a violation means penalties: The Democratic congressional delegation and DNC members from Florida would lose their votes for the nominee at the Denver convention.

Also, the party's Rules and Bylaws Committee would decide whether to strip Florida of anywhere from half to all of its 185 other delegates to the convention.

The state party would have 30 days to change its plan before the sanctions would go into effect. Florida's Democratic lawmakers are pledging to fight back.

"We are quite concerned that Florida Democrats are going to lose their right to vote," Sen. Bill Nelson told reporters Friday. Recalling the 2000 presidential election controversy in Florida, he added, "And of all states, we have the sensitivity of this because of what we have gone through."

In 2000, the election between Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Al Gore was held up for a recount in Florida. The Supreme Court stopped the recount, and Bush won the state by 537 votes.

Michigan's Legislature has taken up a bill that would move its contest to Jan. 15, but the state party submitted a proposal that for now describes a caucus on Feb. 9. New Hampshire's secretary of state says he may move up the state's primary, but for now the party has submitted a plan for Jan. 22, with the notation that the date is subject to change. .

As should be pretty apparent, there is the potential for some very hard feelings here.  Especially among Floridian Democrats, who seem to feel that the 2000 election entitles them to chronic aggrieved party status. 

It seems hard to imagine that the national Democratic party would disenfranchise Florida in the 2008 convention, but you're reading the same article I am -- and the Associated Press isn't exactly an arm of the Republic National Committee.

Let's all keep an eye out and see how this progresses.


HILLARY CLINTON'S FEAR OF TERRORISM

Ken Berwitz

Sometimes words fail me.  Not often, I admit, but sometimes.

Read this report from the New York Post and you'll know what does it:.

August 24, 2007 -- WASHINGTON - Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton yesterday raised the prospect of a terror attack before next year's election, warning that it could boost the GOP's efforts to hold on to the White House.

Discussing the possibility of a new nightmare assault while campaigning in New Hampshire, Clinton also insisted she is the Democratic candidate best equipped to deal with it.

"It's a horrible prospect to ask yourself, 'What if? What if?' But if certain things happen between now and the election, particularly with respect to terrorism, that will automatically give the Republicans an advantage again, no matter how badly they have mishandled it, no matter how much more dangerous they have made the world," Clinton told supporters in Concord.

"So I think I'm the best of the Democrats to deal with that," she added.

That, folks, is the likely presidential candidate of the Democratic party, telling you that her fear of terrorism is that it might toss votes to the Republican party. 

What an unbelievably cynical, self involved political reaction.  And please remember, this was neither an attack on Ms. Clinton by one of her opponents nor an assumption about how she would see this on my part.  It is what she herself said at a campaign rally.

Obviously Hillary Clinton has learned very well from her husband.  The meaning of a terrorist attack is how it affects her vote count.

It's all about her.


HILLARY CLINTON'S FEAR OF TERRORISM

Ken Berwitz

Sometimes words fail me.  Not often, I admit, but sometimes.

Read this report from the New York Post and you'll know what does it:.

August 24, 2007 -- WASHINGTON - Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton yesterday raised the prospect of a terror attack before next year's election, warning that it could boost the GOP's efforts to hold on to the White House.

Discussing the possibility of a new nightmare assault while campaigning in New Hampshire, Clinton also insisted she is the Democratic candidate best equipped to deal with it.

"It's a horrible prospect to ask yourself, 'What if? What if?' But if certain things happen between now and the election, particularly with respect to terrorism, that will automatically give the Republicans an advantage again, no matter how badly they have mishandled it, no matter how much more dangerous they have made the world," Clinton told supporters in Concord.

"So I think I'm the best of the Democrats to deal with that," she added.

That, folks, is the likely presidential candidate of the Democratic party, telling you that her fear of terrorism is that it might toss votes to the Republican party. 

What an unbelievably cynical, self involved political reaction.  And please remember, this was neither an attack on Ms. Clinton by one of her opponents nor an assumption about how she would see this on my part.  It is what she herself said at a campaign rally.

Obviously Hillary Clinton has learned very well from her husband.  The meaning of a terrorist attack is how it affects her vote count.

It's all about her.


CINDY SHEEHAN'S 16TH MINUTE

Ken Berwitz

Is it just me or is Ms. Sheehan's period of fame over?  

As you are probably aware, the left has pretty much finished with Sheehan since a) she no longer commands the glut of media attention that made her valuable to them in the first place and b) because she is apparently running for congress against the leftwing icon, Nancy Pelosi, they now probably see her as a distinct liability.

In any event, Sheehan and what's left of her followers tried to annoy the Bush family at their vacation home in Kennebunkport, Maine this weekend.  Here's how it went (as usual, the bold print is mine):.

Anti-war protesters march in Kennebunkport

KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine --Even though President Bush wasn't in town, hundreds of anti-war protesters including Cindy Sheehan marched by the Bush family compound on a scorching, muggy Saturday.

"This is really energizing to be with people who want this war to end," Sheehan, who lost a son in Iraq, told the cheering crowd. "We can't put our signs away and sit on our couches. We have to press Congress to end this war."

Activists from a number of states came to a local school to begin a two-mile march to the Bush summer home at Walker's Point. Along the way some pounded drums, chanted and carried signs and banners with slogans such as "Don't Pay for this War" and "Care for Vets."

Police gave no official crowd count, but other observers estimated that at least 1,200 demonstrators turned out. One of the marchers, Alice Copeland Brown of Canton, Mass., said about 3,000 people were there.

Brown said her son has recently returned from duty in Iraq, but others are not coming home alive. Brown said billions of dollars are being wasted on the war that could be used for schools, health care and other public services.

"Our children are dying for nothing," she said.

Dick Nelson of Lebanon, N.H., said he was visiting Maine and decided to come to the rally with his 16-year-old daughter, Andrea.

"It seemed like our civic duty," said Nelson.

A small-scale Vietnam Wall-like monument, listing the names of the soldiers killed in Iraq, was set up on the school's sports field where the protesters assembled. Organizers included veterans' peace groups.

After the march, the Indigo Girls musical group entertained the demonstrators at the rally site.

Some protesters called for Bush's and Vice President Dick Cheney's impeachment, but others had more moderate messages of support for the troops and opposition to the war.

"You can support the troops and not support the war," said Anne Chay, whose son is serving in Iraq.

Democratic presidential hopeful Dennis Kucinich, who was also a frequent visitor to Maine during his 2004 campaign, told the crowd, "We simply have to get out of Iraq. We have to end this war."

Organizers had previously hoped to draw as many as 10,000 protesters to the rally.

Observers said verbal skirmishes with some of the counter-protesters broke out along the march route, but no violence or physical confrontations were reported. As many as a few dozen counter-protesters were said to be in the area.  .

Hundreds of protesters?  1,200?  Even maybe 3,000?  That's what they could drum up from the combined total of several states' worth of recruitment?

Hmmm.  This ain't exactly the million man march, is it?  And the Bushies weren't even there to see it, were they?

Poor Cindy.  Even the flow-thru tear ducts every time her son's name is mentioned won't bring back those big crowds.

But maybe it will give Casey Sheehan something to smile about in his grave.  After all, he rejected his mother's position on Iraq - the one she claims is all for him - by enlisting in the army, and then re-enlisting when he knew full well he would probably wind up in Iraq during that second tour of duty.

Maybe the poor turnout is God's way of telling Cindy Sheehan "Your son says 'will you finally at long last stop using me as an excuse for your media campaign.  Go home, mom.  Just go home'"


CINDY SHEEHAN'S 16TH MINUTE

Ken Berwitz

Is it just me or is Ms. Sheehan's period of fame over?  

As you are probably aware, the left has pretty much finished with Sheehan since a) she no longer commands the glut of media attention that made her valuable to them in the first place and b) because she is apparently running for congress against the leftwing icon, Nancy Pelosi, they now probably see her as a distinct liability.

In any event, Sheehan and what's left of her followers tried to annoy the Bush family at their vacation home in Kennebunkport, Maine this weekend.  Here's how it went (as usual, the bold print is mine):.

Anti-war protesters march in Kennebunkport

KENNEBUNKPORT, Maine --Even though President Bush wasn't in town, hundreds of anti-war protesters including Cindy Sheehan marched by the Bush family compound on a scorching, muggy Saturday.

"This is really energizing to be with people who want this war to end," Sheehan, who lost a son in Iraq, told the cheering crowd. "We can't put our signs away and sit on our couches. We have to press Congress to end this war."

Activists from a number of states came to a local school to begin a two-mile march to the Bush summer home at Walker's Point. Along the way some pounded drums, chanted and carried signs and banners with slogans such as "Don't Pay for this War" and "Care for Vets."

Police gave no official crowd count, but other observers estimated that at least 1,200 demonstrators turned out. One of the marchers, Alice Copeland Brown of Canton, Mass., said about 3,000 people were there.

Brown said her son has recently returned from duty in Iraq, but others are not coming home alive. Brown said billions of dollars are being wasted on the war that could be used for schools, health care and other public services.

"Our children are dying for nothing," she said.

Dick Nelson of Lebanon, N.H., said he was visiting Maine and decided to come to the rally with his 16-year-old daughter, Andrea.

"It seemed like our civic duty," said Nelson.

A small-scale Vietnam Wall-like monument, listing the names of the soldiers killed in Iraq, was set up on the school's sports field where the protesters assembled. Organizers included veterans' peace groups.

After the march, the Indigo Girls musical group entertained the demonstrators at the rally site.

Some protesters called for Bush's and Vice President Dick Cheney's impeachment, but others had more moderate messages of support for the troops and opposition to the war.

"You can support the troops and not support the war," said Anne Chay, whose son is serving in Iraq.

Democratic presidential hopeful Dennis Kucinich, who was also a frequent visitor to Maine during his 2004 campaign, told the crowd, "We simply have to get out of Iraq. We have to end this war."

Organizers had previously hoped to draw as many as 10,000 protesters to the rally.

Observers said verbal skirmishes with some of the counter-protesters broke out along the march route, but no violence or physical confrontations were reported. As many as a few dozen counter-protesters were said to be in the area.  .

Hundreds of protesters?  1,200?  Even maybe 3,000?  That's what they could drum up from the combined total of several states' worth of recruitment?

Hmmm.  This ain't exactly the million man march, is it?  And the Bushies weren't even there to see it, were they?

Poor Cindy.  Even the flow-thru tear ducts every time her son's name is mentioned won't bring back those big crowds.

But maybe it will give Casey Sheehan something to smile about in his grave.  After all, he rejected his mother's position on Iraq - the one she claims is all for him - by enlisting in the army, and then re-enlisting when he knew full well he would probably wind up in Iraq during that second tour of duty.

Maybe the poor turnout is God's way of telling Cindy Sheehan "Your son says 'will you finally at long last stop using me as an excuse for your media campaign.  Go home, mom.  Just go home'"


THE FOG OF REID

Ken Berwitz

If you want to know how far Bush Derangement Syndrome sends some people into the netherworld of looney-tune ravings, you need only read this piece by Brian Maloney of www.radioequalizerblogspot.com.  Brian provides a transcript - and his analysis - of a bizarro-world interview of senate malaise leader harry reid conducted by Bill Press, who is to partisanship what ice is to the Arctic Circle.

Read this, listen to the audio link at the bottom, and put a cushion under your jaw, because it's going to drop:.

MIS-REID-ING AMERICA

Harry Blames Bush For His Own Terrible Poll Ratings

*** Exclusive To The Radio Equalizer ***

With less than two years to go in President Bush's second and final term, Democrats have grown so accustomed to blaming him for anything and everything that it must by now be instinctive and automatic.

But even within their own so- called "progressive" ranks, isn't there a limit to just how much can be pinned on the leader they so deeply despise?

During an interview with libtalker Bill Press yesterday, Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid (D-NV) took Bush- bashing into a new realm, actually blaming the president for his own rock- bottom approval ratings!

Take a look for yourself:

(Ed Schultz Show, Bill Press filling in, 23 August 2007, 14:00, segment one)

PRESS: Senator, I'm sure you were disheartened to see yesterday the Gallup organization came out with a new poll that showed that currently today the Congress holds an approval rating among the American people of an all-time low of 18%. Uh, how do you deal with that?

REID: Of course I'm disappointed in that, but if you go back to before they started doing polling, Will Rogers made a living criticizing Congress. Congress has always been criticized and as well it should be; the American people express their frustration through how Congress is doing. But if you go back historically, you'll always find that when you have a president that is so terribly unpopular, it also affects Congress. Ah we have been able to break through this, we've been able to pass minimum wage for the first time in ten years, pass ethics and lobbying reform which is so long overdue, we passed the balanced budget, we have been able to get disaster relief for farmers and ranchers, we've been able to fund children's health till the first of October, we've accomplished a lot. But we have to accomplish a lot more, of course I'm disappointed, I wish our poll numbers were a lot higher, but I understand the realities of the situation.

PRESS: And the reality also, Senator, is that the Republicans have put up a sixty-vote obstacle on most issues, and they have enough votes that they can stop you from getting to sixty.

REID: Bill, they have set the record for filibusters, by more than, if you go back and look at any time in history, you will never find more filibusters than the Republicans have initiated, which has made it very difficult for us to get things done. And I think the reason we were able to get a few things done right before we had our summer recess is because the Republicans have come to the realization that their game isn't working, the American people, you can tell with all the polls going on around the country with senatorial candidates, the Republicans are taking a terrible beating and unless they change dramatically in the next few months, come a year from this November there's gonna be no longer a 51-49 majority in the Senate, there will be a significantly higher (Democrat majority)

(Reid goes on to suggest that Dems may pick up nine Senate seats next year, due to GOP obstructionism)

Senator, how can Bush be to blame for how Americans see Democrats? That's downright kooky! In fact, that may take first prize for the craziest political statement of 2007.

In addition, even if the president is somehow dragging down your party as well, what explains the fact that his approval rating stands at 33%, while yours is a mere 18%?

Also note how instead of challenging Reid on what he must have known was an absurd statement, Press actually tried to cover for him by blaming the GOP's supposed obstructionism for harming congressional Democrats.

Last November, Democrats regained control of Congress based partly on dissatisfaction with Bush and his performance. Now that the public sees Dems as a bigger problem than Bush, attempting to blame the president is a great way to see those historic poll numbers fall even further.

UPDATE:
Ian provides the audio clip. .

You gotta luv this stuff.

There is a Democratic congress.  Why?  Because President Bush is so unpopular that voters rejected him by electing it.  So why has the Democratic congress' poll numbers dropped to historic lows?  Because President Bush is so unpopular, that's why.

Did I not tell you this would be jaw-dropping?

Here is the most powerful senator in the Democratic party, Harry Reid, telling you that the same dissastisfaction with the leader of the opposition party that put his party in power, is causing his party's approval ratings to plummet.  

To buy this insane drivel, you would have to be so dumb, so gullible, so imbecilic and so partisan that you are beyond hope. 

In other words, you would have to be a LAMB (a member of the Lunatic-left And Mega-moonbat Brigade). 

There, that sums it up nicely.


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